A Secret Superpower, Right in Your Backyard

As the verdant hills of Wakanda are secretly enriched with the fictionalmetal vibranium in “Black Panther,” your average backyard also has hidden superpowers: Its soil can absorb and store a significant amount of carbon from the air, unexpectedly making such green spaces an important asset in the battle against climate change. Backyard soils can lock in […]

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Study shows mosquito pesticides do not cause honeybee mortality

LSU AgCenter researchers in the Department of Entomology found mosquito control done properly has minimal effects on the health of honeybees. The three-part study, funded by a 2013 grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, evaluated the effects of pesticides on honeybees. “You have a lot of attention focused on caring for bees and keeping […]

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New Wasp Species Discovered Parasitizing Pests of Pine Trees

  January 19, 2017 by Entomology Today Baryscapus dioryctriae is a newly discovered species of wasp that parasitizes—and could be a potential biological control agent of—two moth species of the genus Dioryctria, a pest of pine trees in China. (Photo credit: Li-Wen Song, et al) By Josh Lancette A new parasitoid wasp species, named Baryscapus […]

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Steve McQueen and the Start of Motorcycle Madness

by Dana In my youth motor cycle racing was a passion. Motocross racing to be specific. The passion began in about 1969 after watching the movie The Great Escape, a World War Two film about; as you might expect, a great prisoner of war escape based upon an actual event.  In the movie, the actor […]

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Characterizing the Link Between Climate and Thermal Limits in Beetles

Kimberly Sheldon, an assistant professor at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (pictured above with a dung beetle near Lake Naivasha, Kenya), studies how temperature change affects insects. (Photo courtesy of Kimberly Sheldon.) January 31, 2017 by Entomology Today By Amanda Biederman Amid concerns over a rapidly changing climate, the abilities of different insects to survive […]

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The Great Imitator!

An almost perfect similarity: A wasp (left) and a moth are barely distinguishable from each other. Credit: Photo Michael Boppré The masquerade is almost perfect. Certain moths of the subfamily Arctiinae are marked with a yellow and black pattern. But these day-active insects have wasp waists and their antennae resemble those of wasps. Their transparent […]

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Ants craft tiny sponges to dip into honey and carry it home

Soaking up a liquid lunchGábor Lőrinczi By Kata Karáth Ants may be smarter than we give them credit for. Tool use is seen as something brainy primates and birds do, but even the humble ant can choose the right tool for the job. István Maák at the University of Szeged in Hungary and his team […]

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Beetles that pose as an ant’s abdomen to hitch a ride!

How do you hitch a ride on an army ant? Try masquerading as an ant butt. At least, that’s the strategy that seems to work for the newly described beetle species Nymphister kronaueri. Seen from above, a colony of Eciton mexicanum army ants marching across the forest floor looked perfectly normal to researchers surveying the […]

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Western Exterminator, formerly Pratt Pest raises money for breast cancer research

Western Exterminator, formerly Pratt Pest raises money for breast cancer research Dana Western Exterminator, formerly Pratt Pest of Camano Island, president and founder of Western Exterminator, formerly Pratt Pest Northwest, announced a company-wide effort to raise money to support of Susan G. Komen Puget Sound, which raises money for breast cancer research. Western Exterminator, formerly […]

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WSDA finds gypsy moths thick in Seattle

Washington State Department of Agriculture has trapped 10 Asian gypsy months, plus 32 European gypsy moths, including 21 in a Seattle neighborhood. OLYMPIA — The Washington State Department of Agriculture has trapped 42 gypsy moths this year, including 21 of the European variety on Seattle’s Capitol Hill, a densely populated residential district. The 42 also […]

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